Summer Latin Workshop

The Department of Classics will offer The Intensive Latin Workshop during Summer Semester 2015 (May 11 to July 31) for 12 credits. The Intensive Latin Workshop covers the equivalent material of Latin 1101.01, 1102.01, 1103, and two 2000-level Latin courses as well as the General Education for Foreign Language.

The Workshop will meet daily from 9:00-12:00 and from 1:00-4:00, and will cover all Latin Grammar needed to read classical and medieval authors in the first half; the second half will be spent reading Vergil, Cicero and Ovid and a selection of other authors will be selected according to student interest. 

The Workshop will require a full-time commitment from both the teachers and the students. Typically there will be two to four hours of homework every day, a quiz every morning and a three hour exam every Monday. During the first half of the term, the emphasis will fall on the memorization of forms and on learning and applying the basic rules of Latin syntax and grammar. Morning classes will begin with a quiz and then go over the exercises for the previous evening; afternoon classes will introduce new forms and basic grammatical concepts in a lecture. Staff will be available for office hours before, during and after the workshop and students will be able to call instructors at home if there are difficulties with any of the evening assignments. The Department of Classics houses the Latin Pages, which includes resources developed specifically for the Latin Workshop as well as interactive pages for help in memorization of forms and rules. We are committed to helping students learn to read and use Latin in a very short time and will do what we can to make this possible. It is NOT recommended that students hold down jobs or have other significant commitments during the Workshop.

During the second half of the term, the class will read selections from major writers of the Classical and Medieval periods. Vergil, Cicero and Ovid are the assigned authors; we will try to meet the interests and needs of students in segments devoted to other selections (e.g. Augustine, Medieval or Renaissance Latin).

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